Bugging Out When Necessary – Positive Mental Attitude (PMA)

Bugging Out When Necessary

Positive Mental Attitude (PMA) – A positive mental attitude is tough to evaluate, as it should be evaluated under stress to see just how you or members of your group are going to react. It might be compared to a nurse in the emergency room, can you and familyouting1those with you remember what to do? How to carry out the plan? Keep their head about them?

Knowing “thyself” is extremely important in a survival situation and bears directly on how well you cope with serious stresses such as: pain, fear and anxiety, injury, cold and heat, hunger and thirst, sleep deprivation and other stress related issues. If you are the “leader” of the group, then you will be responsible to know this about members that are being affected by what is going on, as well as how you handle these circumstances. This is no easy job, but one that could save you and the others. Try to evaluate your group on the 1-10 scale of the matrix and see just how well you believe you and your groups will handle the stress of an emergency.

As we close out this series of articles we hope you have given some thought to what you and your group need to do in preparation for a possible urgent situation. We have purposely written in terms we feel the most novice of persons can see the need and Front-Rear Coverbegin “prepping” for a time when they may need skills that will save them from a crisis. It is never too early to begin thinking about a plan of action. If you have the opportunity, go through a course in survival. This way you can learn firsthand skills before they are needed. The training will give you confidence in yourself and will better prepare you when the time comes and you need what you have learned. This also will assist you in using the matrix for your evaluation of yourself and others. The matrix is a tool that should be considered a major part of your plan.

A few hours spent in applying what you learn in a course and finding that you can accomplish things that previously seemed impossible will remove doubt about your personal ability and stamina. You may find out things about yourself, such as how you react in an emergency, what your tolerance to different physical and mental stresses are and how can you influence the group in a way that will help them and you! These are all things that should be given thought and practice. Take one step at a time and know when it is time to “bug out”, you are ready!

 

Overall preparation for what nature can throw at us is not that overwhelming but it does take a little effort. USI has a wealth of information, equipment and training for everyone about all forms of mitigation so visit our web site at www.usiusa.com and if you have a need feel free to call!

USI Understands that Survival isn’t learned from books but real world experience. This is just one area which makes Universal Survival Innovations unique in the world of training and equipment.

Check us out at: Website   Facebook   Twitter   Amazon   LinkedIn   YouTube   Shop

Author Ben Barr is a 30+ year SERE Specialist who has been a curriculum developer for the USAF Survival School, USAF Water Survival School, USAF Air Mobility Command, USMC and USN

Copyright® Universal Survival Innovations 2016

Disclaimer, Content Usage, Limitation of Liability, and Privacy Policy

 

Bugging Out When Necessary – Physical Condition

Bugging Out When Necessary

Physical Conditioning – Continuing into the second half of the USI Matrix Section 2 we look at the physical condition of you or your group to see exactly how you score. Remember, you will grade yourself and each member on a scale of 1-10. To get your group score you will divide by the number in your party. USI Team will divide by 10, as that is how many we have in our group. Your weakest link will be  where you build from. In our situation we have a five year old; therefore, our consideration will be for her dreamstimemaximum_18076509needs and abilities. If you plan to move out of your location and you have a child’s wagon, that is a great tool for taking care of small children. Consideration must be how many of you are in good physical condition and how can you withstand the hardships that might come with an emergency. Things to consider, if you are leaving your location are how many of your group can carry a backpack of 40 lbs for any distance. Again, a great tool to help those unable to carry their load is to have a golf cart that they can pull. It can act as a backpack and will hold most of what is needed. It may be necessary for the group to share the load of some and the stronger carry more than the usual 40 lbs.

The team should be able to travel 10 miles a day if they have evaluated all the previous steps and know the physical condition of each member. Of course, if you are alone and in good condition and have kept yourself fit, then you will be able to travel much longer than with a group. Not many people stay in condition well enough and have the upper body strength to be able to walk over tough terrain for 10 miles, but then again, know yourself and your group to determine what you/they are capable.

If you are staying in place during the emergency you will still have to know what each member is capable. There will be jobs to be carried out that require strength and stamina while you wait for the situation to improve. Although you may decide to stay in place, you need to be aware that the situation may turn and it would be necessary to

Emergency Escape Plan with red pen

Emergency Escape Plan with red pen

leave, consequently, evaluation of the group and their physical condition still applies. Being prepared to leave should always be a concern. The environment where you are and where you have determined to go is also important. We will touch on that next.

 

 

 

Overall preparation for what nature can throw at us is not that overwhelming but it does take a little effort. USI has a wealth of information, equipment and training for everyone about all forms of mitigation so visit our web site at www.usiusa.com and if you have a need feel free to call!

USI Understands that Survival isn’t learned from books but real world experience. This is just one area which makes Universal Survival Innovations unique in the world of training and equipment.

Check us out at: Website   Facebook   Twitter   Amazon   LinkedIn   YouTube   Shop

Author Ben Barr is a 30+ year SERE Specialist who has been a curriculum developer for the USAF Survival School, USAF Water Survival School, USAF Air Mobility Command, USMC and USN

Copyright® Universal Survival Innovations 2016

Disclaimer, Content Usage, Limitation of Liability, and Privacy Policy

 

Basic rules for Travel Safe Training.

Airplane silhouette on sunsetStuff happens, but of all the stories the ones concerning tourist bother me the most. When people disappear on vacation or business it dredges up stories of kidnapping and ransom. Our hearts go out to all the victims of these terrible crimes.

 

After having developed and written many “travel safe programs” we have Identified some basic rules which should never be violated,

1. Like on a dive (SCUBA), never travel alone. Always use the buddy system.

2. Always leave your intended route with at least TWO responsible individuals. One should be a family member and the other a friend which can collaborate the information to the authorities. Family members will say/do anything to get help, collaborating information will re-enforce the validity of the information.

3. In addition to the route leave a “drop dead” time for your return with the same people. Also make arrangements to call them when you are back. Make SURE YOU make the call!

4. If you are keeping your motel room leave a piece of well worn clothing behind. I know it sounds bad but even tracking dogs have their limits and need help. A strong sent and early deployment of the dog is the key.

5. If in trouble DON’T follow the “no trace” rule! The more “sign” you can leave for a tracker the better your chances. In addition you are leaving a stronger scent trail for the dogs.

6. Make sure you are carrying at least a personal survival kit which fits your surroundings and satisfies your basic needs.

7. SIGNAL often! You never know who is out there. Whistle and mirrors during the day and fire light at night.

8. If it is a captive situation remain calm, humanize yourself to the captors and attempt to get on TV if available. Most captors want something and will use you to get it.

9.Finally, Don’t Panic! Regardless of the situation panic makes it worse.

Overall preparation for what nature can throw at us is not that overwhelming but it does take a little effort. USI has a wealth of information, equipment and training for everyone about all forms of mitigation so visit our web site at www.usiusa.com and if you have a need feel free to call!

USI Understands that Survival isn’t learned from books but real world experience. This is just one area which makes Universal Survival Innovations unique in the world of training and equipment.

Check us out at: Website   Facebook   Twitter   Amazon   LinkedIn   YouTube   Shop

Author Ben Barr is a 30+ year SERE Specialist who has been a curriculum developer for the USAF Survival School, USAF Water Survival School, USAF Air Mobility Command, USMC and USN

Universal Survival Innovations presents: An Introduction to Urban Survival

Recently Universal Survival Innovations was invited to present a lecture at the Columbia, SC Stake – Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints on Urban Survival. We now have these lectures available for all to view and share. 

Click on the images below to be taken to the appropriate lecture. Be sure and LIKE us and SHARE please!

Universal Survival Innovations LDS Presentation 1 - Urban Survival-1

Universal Survival Innovations LDS Presentation 2 - ORE-1Universal Survival Innovations LDS Presentation 4 - Moving Out of the Danger Zone-1Universal Survival Innovations LDS Presentation 5 - Selected Area For Evacuation-1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Overall preparation for what nature can throw at us is not that overwhelming but it does take a little effort. USI has a wealth of information, equipment and training for everyone about all forms of mitigation so visit our web site at www.usiusa.com and if you have a need feel free to call!

USI Understands that Survival isn’t learned from books but real world experience. This is just one area which makes Universal Survival Innovations unique in the world of training and equipment.

Check us out at: Website   Facebook   Twitter   Amazon   LinkedIn   YouTube

Author Ben Barr is a 30+ year SERE Specialist who has been a curriculum developer for the USAF Survival School, USAF Water Survival School, USAF Air Mobility Command, USMC and USN

8 Days Adrift!

http://www.dreamstime.com/royalty-free-stock-images-sinking-schooner-image16210789“The men, in their mid 50s and not wearing life jackets, were hypothermic, severely dehydrated, and vomiting from ingesting saltwater. They were completely waterlogged, as they were lying in six inches of water on the top of the boat. Stallings told the Sun Sentinel that their skin was deteriorating, their eyes were droopy, and that when he pinched their skin, it stayed in place for about four seconds, which is a sign of dehydration.”

Eight days pushes the boundary of the body’s ability to survive, and if it hadn’t been for the intervention of a passing ship, neither man could have gone on much longer. The test for dehydration that the Coast Guard swimmer conducted on the two men is effective.  Pinching the skin slightly and pulling to check for skin elasticity helps determine the amount of liquid stored in the fat cells. This is called Turgor. To determine skin turgor, the health care provider grasps the skin on the back of the hand, lower arm, or abdomen between two fingers so that it is tented up. The skin is held for a few seconds then released.

Skin with normal turgor snaps rapidly back to its normal position. Skin with decreased turgor remains elevated and returns slowly to its normal position.  Decreased skin turgor is a late sign in dehydration. It occurs with moderate to severe dehydration. Fluid loss of 5% of the body weight is considered mild dehydration, 10% is moderate, and 15% or more is severe dehydration.

From every Survival Situation we can learn another lesson, and this one is no different. The USI Team is very happy that these men made it out alive and we congratulate the US Coast Guard for another successful rescue, and the cargo ship for their intervention.

Original Story found at: http://www.grindtv.com/outdoor/outposts/post/two-fishermen-rescued-after-drifting-atop-capsized-boat-for-eight-days/

 

 Overall preparation for what nature can throw at us is not that overwhelming but it does take a little effort. USI has a wealth of information, equipment and training for everyone about all forms of mitigation so visit our web site at www.usiusa.com and if you have a need feel free to call!

USI Understands that Survival isn’t learned from books but real world experience. This is just one area which makes Universal Survival Innovations unique in the world of training and equipment.

Check us out at: Website   Facebook   Twitter   Amazon   LinkedIn   YouTube

Author Ben Barr is a 30+ year SERE Specialist who has been a curriculum developer for the USAF Survival School, USAF Water Survival School, USAF Air Mobility Command, USMC and USN