Bugging Out When Necessary – Environment

Bugging Out When Necessary!

Environment – Environment can be a very essential part of your survival. You must know, as best possible, many factors in order to remain safe at your present location or moving on to your Selected Area of Evacuation (S.A.F.E.). Some of the important things to know are, age of those in the area you are, the socio/economics, the physical dreamstimemaximum_362161location, i.e. are you in the city, country, wilderness, etc. what is the growing season and what is the weather?

Why is this awareness necessary? If those around you are not of like mind for survival you could be in danger. If the socio/economics is not pretty much the same as yours you could be a target for others. If, when your food supply is out, you do not have the ability to get more, what do you do? All of these questions need to be thought about when making your plan and practicing your plan. Weather is often not the main issue, but is a consideration. You must know the seasons in the location where you are. All of this is important as you plan for an emergency for staying in place or moving on.

If you are in the country and have a garden and a pond to fish, you pretty much have a choice place to stay if those around you are in much the same position. In this friendly inhabited area you may regard any human being you encounter as someone who will work with you and be a part of the group to create a safe environment as you go through the emergency. In such an area your primary problem facing you will be to satisfy your material needs for an extended period of time till the crisis is over.

But, if you live in the city or in an urban area that is highly populated, your evaluation dreamstimemaximum_5102722needs to be much more carefully thought out. Do you need to leave the particular location you are in and can you? Are the roads open for travel or will you have to take your gear and “move out”? Weighing the factors under survival conditions will be a trying thing to do. Keep your head whether you are staying or leaving the area. Be flexible in the plan you have spent so much time designing. Know that no plan will probably go as mapped out. Any plan is only as good as your ability to carry it out.

Providing you recognize the difficulties of carrying out your plan of action under survival conditions, you should be able to take positive action with a Positive Mental Attitude go_bag_exploded(PMA). We will discuss this in our closing article.

 

Overall preparation for what nature can throw at us is not that overwhelming but it does take a little effort. USI has a wealth of information, equipment and training for everyone about all forms of mitigation so visit our web site at www.usiusa.com and if you have a need feel free to call!

USI Understands that Survival isn’t learned from books but real world experience. This is just one area which makes Universal Survival Innovations unique in the world of training and equipment.

Check us out at: Website   Facebook   Twitter   Amazon   LinkedIn   YouTube   Shop

Author Ben Barr is a 30+ year SERE Specialist who has been a curriculum developer for the USAF Survival School, USAF Water Survival School, USAF Air Mobility Command, USMC and USN

Copyright® Universal Survival Innovations 2016

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Bugging Out When Necessary – Equipment

Bugging Out When Necessary

Equipment – In order to assist with the evaluation of equipment, we have divided the skill level types into three categories based on The Matrix Section 1 from 1-10. The levels are beginner/novice (1-3) moderate skill level (4-6) and professional 7-10). This means that the equipment in your pack is based on what you are skilled to use. It could be that young members of the family or someone who has never been trained in any DSC_0556type of emergency techniques would have to have the beginner’s bag level. Here is where the personal assessment is needed. Be fair with yourself, to say you are better than you are in using your equipment is just as bad as having equipment that should be more sophisticated. From the USI Prior Preparation Planner, “Nothing is more IMPORTANT than TRAINING and having the proper support EQUIPMENT.” This same way of evaluating may help in your first assessment, training/skill sets.

Assuming you and the members of your group have evaluated yourselves on just how much training/skill sets you have, now you must decide what type of equipment will serve your purpose when and if an emergency arises. Remember, Luck is only a 1 on the matrix and Training/Skill set and Equipment make up the 9. Although training can be DSC_0019objective, based on the needs and personal skills, equipment selection is precise, but again you must evaluate your need. As the Planner points out, there is good equipment and bad equipment. Equipment should be chosen because of quality, not cost. When deciding what you need or for your group, just remember, few companies produce all quality items but most all companies have a few quality pieces. You cannot afford to have your equipment fail, your survival kit may be the only thing you have to depend on when having to “bug out”. The ability to resupply will probably not be possible. Consequently, research is an important step and planning ahead is never too early.DSC_0576

The Planner suggestion is to consider buying military grade equipment because it is made to last and take abuse. So much poor equipment is on the market it has become very difficult for individuals to select quality and reliable gear for their pack. The most important piece of equipment is your burden carrying pack.  It has to be tough enough to take abuse because it tends to get beaten up and there isn’t much you can do about that. “A quality pack has to withstand being overloaded, tossed around, getting wet, filthy, possibly cut and maybe even falling into the fire.”  Along with a durable bag/pack some of the suggested equipment that will be needed in an emergency situation are, tools of various kinds, rope/cordage, lighting, alternate power sources, emergency weather protection, communications, navigation, medical supplies, personal protective equipment, water purification, and food procurement. Each one of these areas needs to be thought through and decided what the individual needs are. In The Planner each equipment area gives what could possibly be needed depending on the circumstances. Now it becomes obvious why ones carrying device has to be strong and made well.Front-Rear Cover

Once you have evaluated what you need, purchased quality gear, practiced using the equipment, be sure you pack your own bag and know where each item is. It is important that each member of your family or team knows his/her bag and where each piece of gear is. Each bag may have different items that has been personally chosen for that individual and for a certain purpose. It is so important as part of a team for each to know his/her role but more important for him/her to carry out that role without concern for where their equipment is to accomplish their role. Keep in mind that the goal for each person involved, is to be as close to the 10 score for training/skill sets, equipment, and luck as possible.

 

Overall preparation for what nature can throw at us is not that overwhelming but it does take a little effort. USI has a wealth of information, equipment and training for everyone about all forms of mitigation so visit our web site at www.usiusa.com and if you have a need feel free to call!

USI Understands that Survival isn’t learned from books but real world experience. This is just one area which makes Universal Survival Innovations unique in the world of training and equipment.

Check us out at: Website   Facebook   Twitter   Amazon   LinkedIn   YouTube   Shop

Author Ben Barr is a 30+ year SERE Specialist who has been a curriculum developer for the USAF Survival School, USAF Water Survival School, USAF Air Mobility Command, USMC and USN

Copyright® Universal Survival Innovations 2016

Disclaimer, Content Usage, Limitation of Liability, and Privacy Policy

 

Bugging Out When Necessary! – Training and Skill Set

Bugging Out When Necessary

adding fuel by stages 3

Training and Skill set – For the next few articles we will take you through each area of the USI Survival Matrix and discuss what you should be looking for in your evaluation. With each step we will explain what is best and how to reach that goal.  This entire series of articles will be based around the USI Team and family and how we would go about achieving the maximum advantage if an emergency occurred. First, Training and Skill set. Not too many of us are truly a 7 as our matrix shows. In our USI family we are fortunate to have a 7 as our leader and he is also the one who trains all other members. Most people would fall in the 5 or less when it comes to knowing what to do with the equipment purchased or how to proceed if having to relocate.

Practicing as an “adventure” is an excellent way to teach yourself and members of your family. You really need to take that equipment that you have purchased and use it. Plan to take some weekends to practice out in the woods. It can be practiced at home, but it is much better to find a state park or area that allows you to build a fire and campout. Such an experience allows you to play out various scenarios that might occur if necessary to bugout or if the situation is one that you stay in place without conveniences. Finding a good camp site, if not prearranged with the park ranger, is the first step and setting up a cover or tent as a home base.  Next would be gathering wood for your fire when time to cook after hunting your food for the evening.  Remember, if you have brought some food or if you have stored food at home, it will not last long in a real emergency. There will be a need to know how to kill your own food or what berries and plants to eat.  The weekend should be fun, but also educational and challenging for those being taught. It will take more than one weekend to acquire training and skills that will get you through a tough situation.dreamstimemaximum_2672262

Once your campsite is set up and you are ready with kindling and wood to start your fire, the group or individual needs to begin orienting him/herself in the new surroundings. If there is a body of water, then learning to catch fish could be the meal for the evening or if animals like squirrels are in the area, that might be the fare. Just remember, you are simulating what some day may be a real situation, so each skill becomes a valuable lesson to be improved on when you take a weekend “adventure training” session. Things that you might consider working on are emergency shelter, studying plants that are edible, practicing building a fire, cooking over an outside fire, finding water and a way to purify it, practice using a map and compass, knowing what to do for first aid.  These are but a few of the skills you will need to have to evaluate yourself and others in your group.

For the USI Team and family this is an ongoing process with skills being taught all the time. We have a large group of 10, all ages.  When very young, children are taught how to use various items, such as knives and the dangers of such. They are shown plants that can and cannot be eaten.  They go camping and are taught their role in the team.  Each person has his/her role to carry out and as the child matures, the more advanced their role becomes. Agreed, this takes a great deal of thinking through and carrying out, but we at USI feel it is an important part of a person’s education that is not taught anywhere else. On the first evaluation of the matrix we have a 7 but our team has about all levels from 2-6. Think about your family or team, what is their score for training and skill set?

 

 

Overall preparation for what nature can throw at us is not that overwhelming but it does take a little effort. USI has a wealth of information, equipment and training for everyone about all forms of mitigation so visit our web site at www.usiusa.com and if you have a need feel free to call!

USI Understands that Survival isn’t learned from books but real world experience. This is just one area which makes Universal Survival Innovations unique in the world of training and equipment.

Check us out at: Website   Facebook   Twitter   Amazon   LinkedIn   YouTube   Shop

Author Ben Barr is a 30+ year SERE Specialist who has been a curriculum developer for the USAF Survival School, USAF Water Survival School, USAF Air Mobility Command, USMC and USN

Copyright® Universal Survival Innovations 2016

Disclaimer, Content Usage, Limitation of Liability, and Privacy Policy

 

Bugging Out When Necessary! – USI Survival Matrix

The USI Survival Matrix is an evaluation tool used to measure the individual’s capabilities in an emergency situation whether part of a group or not. ANY total number, on the first section of the matrix, over the Target Score set by the matrix is considered “icing” on the cake! The second half of the matrix will always MAX at 30 points since each line item is set on a scale of 10.

MATRIX SECTION 1

Target SCORE is 10

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Section 1 addresses finding the strengths and weaknesses of yourself or your group. For example: you may have a lot of training so your lack of equipment isn’t a show stopper. However, if you have minimal or no training then you better compensate with some effective high tech gear until you improve your skills! Just remember, if you score higher than the “target” score then good for you, but for evaluation purposes it’s still a 10.

The second half of the matrix takes into account all other considerations for an effective overall survivability evaluation.

MATRIX SECTION 2

Maximum SCORE of 30

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Each line item in section 2 is based on a 1-10 scale and is a self-evaluation (or in the case of physical conditioning members of the group) and an evaluation of your surroundings. Inclusive items which will be taken into consideration will be age, socio/economic, physical location (i.e. city, country, wilderness, etc), growing seasons and more. The last line item, PMA, will be tough to evaluate as PMA has to be evaluated under stressful situations – Like a nurse in the emergency room! The ultimate question is “What’s their attitude when the going gets tough?” Tough to evaluate but VERY important!!

In the Matrix above the individual scored a total of 29 out of 40 so there is room for improvement and the matrix identifies where. Like everything in survival, certain aspects such as PMA can compensate other things (such as a terrible environment) but it won’t compensate for lack of equipment (such as not having a knife).

Overall, the USI Survival Matrix provides a snapshot view of individual capabilities. In future articles we will break down each line item in both sections so you have an in-depth idea of how to find you TRUE survivability in any situation.

Overall preparation for what nature can throw at us is not that overwhelming but it does take a little effort. USI has a wealth of information, equipment and training for everyone about all forms of mitigation so visit our web site at www.usiusa.com and if you have a need feel free to call!

USI Understands that Survival isn’t learned from books but real world experience. This is just one area which makes Universal Survival Innovations unique in the world of training and equipment.

Check us out at: Website   Facebook   Twitter   Amazon   LinkedIn   YouTube   Shop

Author Ben Barr is a 30+ year SERE Specialist who has been a curriculum developer for the USAF Survival School, USAF Water Survival School, USAF Air Mobility Command, USMC and USN

Copyright® Universal Survival Innovations 2016

Disclaimer, Content Usage, Limitation of Liability, and Privacy Policy